In Slasher S4E3, we get a fuller view of just how dysfunctional this family really is. It’s the type of view that sheds light on character building and self-discovery. With a spoiler-free review, some of my points will take some mental gymnastics, but I’ve been stretching all day. Let’s dig in!

George Carlin used to say he had one child for ‘replacement value’ and anything else was greedy. I can see that in play here. We know that the patriarch built the familial system around him in a way one would build a company in the 1980s, minus the cocaine. We see the effects on this for the various children – some trying very hard to push out any influence their dad had and others using his influence to gather favors for themselves. Here is where the show goes into deep psychology land.

Two life times of growing – trying to find one’s own voice over the din of the patriarch’s loudspeaker, can leave very different scars – it’s how one deals with those scars that can blur the line between good and evil.

Jim in a non-spoiler way giving the episode a theme

What would you do for your kids?

Would you steal? Beg? Kill? Die for them? Would you give everything you’ve got to give them even a small leg up? Would you, instead, see them as disposable – an extension of you that could be recalled at any time? As much as we see the dynamics between parent and child, it is the scar tissue left that is of interest here.

Scars can make you stronger – What doesn’t kill you, etc etc. Scars can also remind one of a time where things didn’t line up for you or a narrow escape from death by misadventure. A scar is a cool drinking story for one person and a life long regret for another. Some of us have scars that can’t be seen and others, myself included, wear our emotional scars on our skin (tattoos for me). What one does with a scar is at least as important as how one received the scar.

Two life times of growing – trying to find one’s own voice over the din of the patriarch’s loudspeaker, can leave very different scars – it’s how one deals with those scars that can blur the line between good and evil. As we sit and watch in judgement – make no illusions, as audience we are sole judge, jury, and executioner of the lives presented in celluloid, we should take pause and reflect on our own scars. Would we be so different if our lives started the same as the characters?

A multicolored swirl on notebook greens, yellows, blues, reds, and purple all swirling like the aftermath of a hurricane. 'The hurricane formally known and Prince' is the title of the piece.
As seen on www.davidleeroth.com

The Verdict for Slasher S4E3

David Lee Roth once said, the problem with dreams is by the time they’ve come true, you’ve already become someone else. In that sense, if we wished for a ‘better life’ or ‘why can’t the 1%…’ or ‘if I lived back in those times…’, does it mean we would hold on to ourselves, what we identify as core and essential, if given that chance?

This episode is a character study. Last time we asked about the sins of the father (mother, really) and how they play into or stain a family. Maybe this episode is the revelation of just how rotten a fruit can be. But – and here’s the kicker – just how rotten would our fruit be if we were in their shoes? What about us do we keep out of the light? What’s held tight and what’s on the table? In this, all things are decided.

5 out of 5 stars (5 / 5)
Slasher S4E3 a close up of a plague doctor looking (eyes no mouth, but nose) person in a cracked white mask and a black top hat looking menacingly.
The cracked face plague doctor is the least of this family’s worries

Jim Phoenix

El Jefe

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Real skull. Don't ask. You wouldn't believe it if I told you.

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