As mentioned in the previous review, this series follows Netflix’s Love, Death & Robots. Feel free to skip this paragraph if you read the first. Tim Miller developed the series and incorporated the talents of several studios. As each episode is independent, there isn’t a need to watch them in any order. I will also note that the episode order shifted from the initial release. These reviews will cover the current order for 2022. Love, Death & Robots targets a mature audience, so some episodes have mature language, nudity, and subjects. This review will cover “When Yogurt Took Over” and “The Secret War.”

When Yogurt Took Over
When Yogurt Took Over

When Yogurt Took Over

Based on John Scalzi’s story and created by Blow Studio, “When Yogurt Took Over” follows the narrative of sentient yogurt. I would call this comedy with no added categories. There are some dark comedy elements, but like “Three Robots,” these are few and far between.

The cast includes Maurice LaMarche and Alexia Dox and has a 6-minute run time. There is little to say about this brief inclusion aside from the animation being notably different than the other entries. However, that is because the other entries either try to be realistic or artistic. “When Yogurt Took Over” could come from any animation studio trying to appeal to a general audience.
2 out of 5 stars (2 / 5)

The Secret War
The Secret War

The Secret War

Based on David W. Amendola’s work and created by Digic Pictures, “The Secret War” follows a Soviet squadron investigating a series of brutal attacks. This episode is an action-packed monster horror with stunningly beautiful–and horrifying–animation. I will point out that the style is reminiscent of some videogames, so I wouldn’t say it has a unique style.

The cast includes Stefan Kapičić, Bruce Thomas, Jeff Berg, Antonio Alvarez and Victor Brandt. With a 16-minute run time, the episode delivers a fleshed-out movie, which is impressive. With the current Ukrainian Crisis in mind, it’s important to mention that the Soviet government is the real villain, even if indirectly.

3.5 out of 5 stars (3.5 / 5)
About the Author

Zeth received his M.A in English with a focus in Creative Writing at CSU, Chico. As a human writer, he published in the 9th volume of Multicultural Echoes, served on the editorial board of Watershed Review, and is a horror reviewer for Haunted MTL. All agree he is a real-life human and not an octopus in human skin. Fascinated by horror novels and their movie adaptations, Zeth channels his bone-riddled arms in their study. Games are also a tasty treat, but he only has the two human limbs to write. If you enjoy his writing, check out his website.

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