Published in June of 2021, Hairpin Bridge is the highly anticipated next novel of Taylor Adams, author of No Exit. No Exit topped charts during its release in 2017, even becoming a Book of the Month Club pick that was raved about. The novel tells the story of a woman trapped at a rest stop with a group of strangers during a snowstorm.

No Exit was probably the best thriller I read during the year it was released. Hairpin Bridge has a similar outcome and feeling to me. It tells the narrative of Lena investigating the supposed suicide of her twin sister, Cambry. Cambry was a young woman living out of her car and travelling the nation when one day, she jumps from a bridge infamous for being a place of suicide.

Cambry’s final words were a text to her sister: “Please forgive me. I couldn’t live with it. Hopefully you can, Officer Raycevic.” It just so happens that Officer Raycevic is on record pulling over Cambry just one hour before her suicide. Lena promises her sister that she will get to the bottom of it – to the truth.

The Verdict

Lena convinces Officer Raymond Raycevic to meet her at Hairpin Bridge to give her closure, saying her therapist encouraged it. What follows is an adrenaline surge, from the very moment Lena and Ray park their cars on the bridge to meet.

“Nightmares do come true, but never in the shape you expect.”

Hairpin Bridge, page 176

Lena – a very empowered woman, as you’ll get to know – is a captivating character. She searches for answers for a sibling she barely knows, just to make sure that justice is served. She is frankly a badass and I’m always surprised when men are able to write a female character with grit and guts in such a true way as Adams does here and in No Exit. Lena takes charge and Lena gets what she needs, while taking no funny business.

The twists and turns deliver over and over again, and I felt no need to roll my eyes at the novel’s revelations as I sometimes do with popular thrillers. Everything here was decently plausible, and I could not stop turning the pages. This follows closely behind No Exit, which I rated five stars. This one is easily four. Pick it up!

4 out of 5 stars (4 / 5)