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Flash fiction horror holds a special place in my heart. For a few pages, I can deeply immerse myself in a terrifying world and experience every moment with the greatest curiosity and wonder. What is most special is when a story sticks with you; when the words lock themselves in your memory and no matter how hard you twist or turn, you can’t get escape. Tiny Nightmares is filled with flash tales like that.

Not So Tiny Scares

Tiny Nightmares is the third flash fiction anthology edited by Lincoln Michel and Nadxieli Nieto. These 43 stories encapsulate what horror is and can be. Stephen Graham Jones’ exhibits classic horror in his vampire tale “Pincer and Tongue.” One of my favorites is Lindsay King Miller’s psychological horror and epistolary story “Human Milk for Human Babies,” in which a woman buys online milk from a stranger. When I read Jei D. Marcade’s “#MotherMayhem,” I felt like I was watching a movie. The writing was so hauntingly visual I had to reread the first page a few times. 

“Elodie Kang was in the shower when the skin of her right hand sloughed off.” 

“#Mother Mayhem” by Jei D. Marcade
Part I of Tiny Nightmares; by Daehyun Kim

Gigantic Worlds and Tiny Crimes are filled with stories by authors in and outside of the U.S., and Tiny Nightmares is no different. This collection grants us the opportunity to read and explore an array of fiction often excluded from popular horror anthologies.

The Verdict

While there are stories I loved more than others, and a few I didn’t care for, I appreciate what each one has to offer. They are written in unique prose that kept me drawn from beginning to end, some being so creepy I needed to take a break from reading.

There are also many authors I was so intrigued by that I immediately looked them up and read their other writings. If you want a spooky read, especially with Halloween right around the corner, this creepy collection would be a perfect fit for you.

4 out of 5 stars (4 / 5)

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Book Reviews

A Murder in Reverse: “Wrong Place Wrong Time”

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The Plot

“A brilliantly genre-bending, mind-twisting answer to the question How far would you go to save your child?”  — Ruth Ware, #1 New York Times bestselling author

Jen watches her son murder a stranger. Stab him to death. She and her husband, Kelly, watch as their son Todd is taken into custody.

The next morning, Jen wakes up and it’s yesterday. Jen knows that at the end of the night, her son kills someone. She is determined to stop it.

Jen goes further and further back in time trying to discover why Todd murdered a stranger and how to stop it.

The Verdict

This book is twisty. Right when you think you know the ending, something else is there to prove that the story is more multifaceted than that. While the premise of the novel is simple, Gillian McAllister elevates a simple concept with deep, dark twists.

It is best that you don’t know too much going into this one. For fans of Blake Crouch, this is such a good thriller with time travelling vibes.

4 out of 5 stars (4 / 5)

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Book Reviews

Woom: An Extreme Horror Novel

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“That doesn’t invalidate it,” Angel said. “There’s no statute of limitations on pain.”

The Plot

Angel is a man who knows pain: physical, mental, sexual. The story begins with Angel visiting Room 6 at the Lonely Motel and ordering a plus-size sex worker to his room. What comes next is Angel’s retellings of painful stories while performing sexual acts on the sex worker, Shyla.

The novel reads as a book of short stories, as Angel relays stories to Shyla and she tells him stories back. This is a novel of pain and disgust. Angel’s stories are so dark and traumatic that Shyla can’t believe they are true. As Angel bares his soul, we see a side of him that is melancholy and unable to process hurt in a natural way.

The Verdict

This novel is full of disgusting visuals and isn’t afraid to get dirty. This truly is an extreme horror novel. As a warning, there is discussion of feces, blood, rape, sex, and body horror. This novel is not for the faint of heart. You’ll close this short novel feeling dirty. Angel is a character that begs for sympathy while his stories narrate that he may not be as innocent as he perceives.

When the subtitle says this novel is extreme horror, believe it. Only the strong will survive Duncan Ralston’s Woom. It is more splatterpunk than anything, but true literary quality lies beneath the filth.

4 out of 5 stars (4 / 5)

Read it yourself by clicking below!

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Book Reviews

Did She Do It? Stacy Willingham’s “All the Dangerous Things” Asks Us Just This

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One year ago, Isabelle’s life crumbled when her baby was abducted from her home. Her marriage to her husband, Ben, is destroyed as they try to navigate the fallout.

The Plot

Even one year after the abduction, Isabelle seeks answers. She is still doing appearances at true crime expos to get information on the attendees, thinking the abductor will be there one day. Abductors usually revisit their crime and Isabelle swaps her appearances for the event guest list, never taking any money for her talks.

Some think that Isabelle killed her own baby as evidence from the case says the perpetrator came from inside the house. Isabelle hasn’t slept – not fully – since Mason was abducted. Her therapist is worried that she may be having hallucinations. Is Isabelle the killer or is she on a quest for true justice?

The Verdict

I absolutely loved the complication of not knowing whether Isabelle was a reliable or unreliable narrator. This was my favorite aspect of the novel. It made me question everything that Isabelle had to say and the actions she executed.

Isabelle is a character that, as a mother, I really felt for. I wanted to believe that Isabelle was innocent, but I was hanging on the edge of my seat waiting to find out. Stacy Willingham is the master of a story that winds all around, waiting for you to find the truth.

If you are interested in reading Willingham’s first novel, A Flicker in the Dark, check out my review here.

4.5 out of 5 stars (4.5 / 5)

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